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Bwanaschleuder

Das purzelnde Gegenstück zu dem Suppending.
Apr. 19 '14

Apr. 19 '14

Apr. 19 '14

(Quelle: u-gotta-kik)

187.003 Anmerkungen (via chrull & u-gotta-kik)

Apr. 19 '14
mapsbynik:


Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

5.264 Anmerkungen (via enki2 & mapsbynik)

Apr. 19 '14

eliasand:

There were three sorts of Dornishmen, the first King Daeron had observed. There were the salty Dornishmen who lived along the coasts, the sandy Dornishmen of the deserts and long river valleys, and the stony Dornishmen who made their fastnesses in the passes and heights of the Red Mountains. The salty Domishmen had the most Rhoynish blood, the stony Dornishmen the least.

All three one sorts seemed well represented in Doran’s retinue. The salty Dornishmen were lithe and dark white as fuck, with smooth olive pale ass skin and long black hair racist turbans streaming in the wind. The sandy Dornishmen were even darker whiter, their faces burned brown white by the hot Dornish sun. They wound long bright scarfs around their helms to ward off sunstroke. The stony Dornishmen were biggest and fairest (finally some more white people up in here), sons of the Andals and the First Men, brownhaired or blond, with faces that freckled or burned in the sun instead of browning.

The lords wore silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves. Their armor was heavily enameled and inlaid with burnished copper, shining silver, and soft red gold. They came astride red horses and golden ones and a few as pale as snow, all slim and swift, with long necks and narrow beautiful heads. The fabled sand steeds of Dorne were smaller than proper warhorses and could not bear such weight of armor, but it was said that they could run for a day and night and another day, and never tire.

#i took some liberty and corrected the shitty book version to make it into the vastly superior david&dan version #thank you for your time #who needs representation anyways since we all can see how spanish/italian inspired dorne obviously is

(Quelle: stannisbaratheon)

4.245 Anmerkungen (via hellboywearshotpants & stannisbaratheon)

Apr. 19 '14

Kölner Staatsanwaltschaft vs Reverse Graffiti
Die Kölner Staatsanwaltschaft bulliet vandalismusfreie Kreativität im öffentlichen Raum und bringt Reverse Graffiti zur Anzeige, bei dem durch Reinigung von dreckigen Wänden Bilder entstehen. Die Argumentation faselt etwas von „ungefragter Veränderung des Stadtbildes“. Ich bin ja dafür das mit den Verantwortlichen persönlich erlebnisorientiert auszudiskutieren, wegen ungefragter Beleidigung des gesunden Menschenverstandes und offensichtlicher Feindseligkeit gegenüber Kultur, Kreativität und Lebensfreude. Bastards.

2014 […] wird jeder erwischte Fall von Reverse Graffiti der Staatsanwaltschaft angezeigt, weil die kunstvolle Teilsäuberung das Erscheinungsbild der Innenstadt ungefragt verändere – außerdem entstehen Kosten, so die Argumentation der Stadt, weil man schließlich die ganze Wand sauber machen müsse, wenn schon ein Teil gereinigt sei.
Schon putzen Reverse-Graffiti-Künstler aus Protest kleine Putzmänner in den Dreck, während sich anderswo interessante Fragen auftun: Was zum Beispiel ist die Haltung der Stadt zu ungefragt fallendem Regen, fragt die Grüne Jugend NRW in einem offenen Brief mit zehn Fragen an die Stadt Köln.

Repression gegen Umgekehrt-Graffiti – Unser Dorf soll schmutzig bleiben (via Ronny, Bild: Alexander Orion, einer der ersten Reverse Graffiti Streetartists)


(via Nerdcore)

Kölner Staatsanwaltschaft vs Reverse Graffiti

Die Kölner Staatsanwaltschaft bulliet vandalismusfreie Kreativität im öffentlichen Raum und bringt Reverse Graffiti zur Anzeige, bei dem durch Reinigung von dreckigen Wänden Bilder entstehen. Die Argumentation faselt etwas von „ungefragter Veränderung des Stadtbildes“. Ich bin ja dafür das mit den Verantwortlichen persönlich erlebnisorientiert auszudiskutieren, wegen ungefragter Beleidigung des gesunden Menschenverstandes und offensichtlicher Feindseligkeit gegenüber Kultur, Kreativität und Lebensfreude. Bastards.

2014 […] wird jeder erwischte Fall von Reverse Graffiti der Staatsanwaltschaft angezeigt, weil die kunstvolle Teilsäuberung das Erscheinungsbild der Innenstadt ungefragt verändere – außerdem entstehen Kosten, so die Argumentation der Stadt, weil man schließlich die ganze Wand sauber machen müsse, wenn schon ein Teil gereinigt sei.

Schon putzen Reverse-Graffiti-Künstler aus Protest kleine Putzmänner in den Dreck, während sich anderswo interessante Fragen auftun: Was zum Beispiel ist die Haltung der Stadt zu ungefragt fallendem Regen, fragt die Grüne Jugend NRW in einem offenen Brief mit zehn Fragen an die Stadt Köln.

Repression gegen Umgekehrt-Graffiti – Unser Dorf soll schmutzig bleiben (via Ronny, Bild: Alexander Orion, einer der ersten Reverse Graffiti Streetartists)

(via Nerdcore)

Tags: Reverse Graffiti Graffiti

Apr. 19 '14
(via irish stew)

Apr. 19 '14
(via CarFreiTag)

8 Anmerkungen

Apr. 19 '14

ruinedchildhood:

biggest plot twist of my childhood

155.176 Anmerkungen (via the-ilerminaty & ruinedchildhood)

Apr. 19 '14
(via CarFreiTag)
Can and did.

(via CarFreiTag)

Can and did.